Steele Prize For Mathematical Expository Essays

Rostislav Grigorchuk of Texas A&M University will be awarded the 2015 AMS Leroy P. Steele Prize for Seminal Contribution to Research at the Joint Mathematics Meetings in January in San Antonio, Texas. Grigorchuk is honored for his influential paper 'Degrees of growth of finitely generated groups and the theory of invariant means,' which appeared in Russian in 1984 in Izvestiya Akademii Nauk SSSR. Seriya Matematicheskaya and in English translation a year later.

This paper gave the first account of Grigorchuk's remarkable discovery of a new class of groups that established counterintuitive results and opened new vistas. The paper stands as a landmark in the development of the now-burgeoning area of geometric group theory.

In mathematics, a group is a set whose elements can be multiplied together, or composed. Any group can be thought of as a group of symmetries, so that multiplication is just the composition of symmetries. A finitely generated group is one that, though usually infinite, has a finite set of elements, called generators, whose iterated products give all group elements.

One can ask how efficiently a finite set of generators generates an infinite group. To this end one looks at how quickly the number of elements obtained by iterated products grows with the number of iterations.

In 1968, John Milnor conjectured that this growth would be either exponential or polynomial, meaning that the number of elements obtained by n-fold products would be either an exponential or a polynomial function of n. Grigorchuk, in his prize-winning paper, discovered previously unknown groups that exhibit "intermediate" growth rates that fall between the two rates in Milnor's conjecture. This means that the number of elements obtained by n-fold products grows faster than any polynomial function of n, but is still sub-exponential. In addition to establishing this very surprising result, the groups Grigorchuk discovered, which have since been named "Grigorchuk groups", have many other amazing properties.

"Grigorchuk's work not only gave solutions to old standing problems but also discovered new exciting classes of groups," the prize citation says. "They found applications in the theory of fractals, holomorphic dynamics, spectral theory of groups and graphs, and theory of finite automata... The work of Grigorchuk has influenced several generations of researchers in group theory. It would be impossible to imagine the modern group theory without Grigorchuk's work."

Presented annually, the AMS Steele Prize is one of the highest distinctions in mathematics. The prize will be awarded at the Joint Mathematics Meetings, Sunday, January 11, 2015 at 4:25 PM, at the Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center in San Antonio, Texas.

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Find out more about AMS prizes and awards at http://ams.org/prizes-awards/prizes.

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Prizes, Awards, and Honors for Women Mathematicians

Prizes and Awards

Lecture Series

Offices


Nobel Prize in Mathematics

A trick question! There is no Nobel prize in mathematics. Why not? That question has created numerous stories, myths, and anecdotes. The most popular is that Nobel's wife had an affair with a mathematician, usually said to be Mittag-Leffler, and in revenge Nobel refused to endow one of his prizes in mathematics. Too bad for this story that Nobel was a life-long bachelor! The other common story is that Mittag-Leffler, the leading Swedish mathematician of Nobel's time, antagonized Nobel and so Nobel gave no prize in mathematics to prevent Mittag-Leffler from becoming a winner. This story is also suspect, however, because Nobel and Mittag-Leffler had almost no contact with each other. Most likely Nobel simply never gave any thought to including mathematics among his list of prize areas.

References:

  1. Garding, Lars and Lars Hormander. "Why is there no Nobel prize in mathematics?" The Mathematical Intelligencer, 7(3)(1985), 73-74.
  2. Ross, Peter. "Why Isn't there a Nobel Prize in Mathematics?" Math Horizons, November 1995, p9. [Reprint from the Math Forum]
  3. Why is there no Nobel Prize in Mathematics?, http://www.almaz.com/Nobel/why_no_math.html, The Nobel Prize Internet Archive

Fields Medal

The Fields Medal is considered to be the equivalent of the Nobel prize for mathematics. John Charles Fields (1863-1932), a Canadian mathematician, endowed funds in his will for an award for mathematical achievement and promise that would emphasize the international character of the mathematical endeavor. The first Fields Medal was awarded at the International Congress of Mathematics meeting in Oslo in 1936. Since 1950 the medal has been awarded every four years at the International Mathematical Congress to between 2 and 4 mathematicians. Although there is no specific age restriction in Fields' will, he did wish that the awards recognize both existing work and the promise of future achievement, so the medals have been restricted to mathematicians under the age of 40.

Women who have won a Fields Medal are:

References:

  1. IMU Awards | Fields Medal, [contains complete list of all winners of the Fields Medal and pictures of the front and back of the medal]
  2. Historical Introduction by Alex Lopez-Ortiz, part of his FAQ site on mathematics.

Ruth Lyttle Satter Prize in Mathematics

[Description from the Notices of the American Mathematical Society]
The Ruth Lyttle Satter Prize in Mathematics was established in 1990 using funds donated to the American Mathematical Society by Joan S. Birman of Columbia University in memory of her sister, Ruth Lyttle Satter. Professor Satter earned a bachelor's degree in mathematics and then joined the research staff at AT&T Bell Laboratories during World War II. After raising a family, she received a Ph.D. in botany at the age of forty-three from the University of Connecticut at Storrs, where she later became a faculty member. Her research on the biological clocks in plants earned her recognition in the U.S. and abroad. Professor Birman requested that the prize be established to honor her sister's commitment to research and to encouraging women in science. The prize is awarded every two years to recognize an outstanding contribution to mathematics research by a woman in the previous five years. The winners have been:


Louise Hay Award for Contributions to Mathematics Education

[Description from the Notices of the American Mathematical Society]
The Executive Committee of the Association for Women in Mathematics established the annual Louise Hay Award for Contributions to Mathematics Education. The purpose of this award is to recognize outstanding achievements in any area of mathematics education, to be interpreted in the broadest possible sense. While Louise Hay was widely recognized for her contributions to mathematical logic and for her strong leadership as head of the Department of Mathematics, Statistics, and Computer Science at the University of Illinois at Chicago, her devotion to students and her lifelong commitment to nurturing the talent of young women and men secure her reputation as a consummate educator. The annual presentation of this award is intended to highlight the importance of mathematical education and to evoke the memory of all that Hay exemplified as a teacher, scholar, administrator, and human being.

The winners have been:

  • 1991 Shirley Frye, National Council for Teachers of Mathematics
  • 1992 Olga Beaver, Williams College
  • 1993 Naomi Fisher, University of Illnois at Chicago
  • 1994 Kaye A. de Ruiz, U.S. Air Force
  • 1995 Etta Falconer, Spelman College [Biography]
  • 1996 Glenda T. Lappan, Michigan State University, and Judith Roitman, University of Kansas [Biography]
  • 1997 Marilyn Burns, Marilyn Burns Education Associates
  • 1998 Deborah Hughes Hallett, Harvard University and the University of Arizona
  • 1999 Martha K. Smith, University of Texas at Austin
  • 2000 Joan Ferrini-Mundy, Michigan State University
  • 2001 Patricia D. Shure, University of Michigan
  • 2002 Annie Sheldon, Tennessee Technological University
  • 2003 Katherine Puckett Layton, Beverly Hills High School and UCLA Graduate School of Education
  • 2004 Bozenna Pasik-Duncan, University of Kansas
  • 2005 Susanna S. Epp, DePaul University
  • 2006 Patricia Kenshaft, Monclair State University
  • 2007 Virginia McShane Warfield, University of Washington
  • 2008 Harriet S. Pollatsek, Mount Holyoke College
  • 2009 Deborah Loewenberg Ball, University of Michigan
  • 2010 Phyllis Z. Chinn, Humboldt State University
  • 2011 Patricia Campbell, University of Maryland
  • 2012 Bonnie Gold, Monmouth University
  • 2013 Amy Cohen, Rutgers University
  • 2014 Sybilla Beckmann, University of Georgia
  • 2015 Christine Stevens, St. Louis University
  • 2016 Judy Walker, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
  • 2017 Cathy Kessel, Illustrative Mathematics

For more information about the award and the recipients, visit Louise Hay Award at the Association for Women in Mathematics web site.


Leroy P. Steele Prize for Seminal Contributions to Research

The Steele Prizes were established in 1970. In 1993, the AMS formalized three categories for the prizes. The prize for "seminal contributions to research" is awarded for a paper, whether recent or not, that has proved to be of fundamental or lasting importance in its field, or a model of important research.

Women mathematicians who have won the prize are:

  • 2007 Karen Uhlenbeck, "Removable singularities in Yang-Mills fields," Comm. Math. Phys. 83 (1982), 11-29; and "Connections with Lp bounds on curvature," Comm. Math. Phys. 83 (1982), 31-42.
  • 2011 Ingrid Daubechies, "orthonormal bases of compactly supported wavelets," Comm. Pure Appl. Math. 41 (1988), 909-996

Leroy P. Steele Prize for Mathematical Exposition

The Steele Prizes were established in 1970. In 1993, the AMS formalized three categories for the prizes. The prize for "mathematical exposition" is awarded for a book or substantial survey or expository research paper.

Women mathematicians who have won the prize are:

  • 1994 Ingrid Daubechies, Ten Lectures on Wavelets, CBMS 61, SIAM, 1992.
  • 2017 Dusa McDuff (with Dietmar Salamon), J-holomorphic Curves and Symplectic Topology, American Mathematical Society Colloquium Publications, 52, 2004.

Leroy P. Steele Prize for Lifetime Achievement

The Steele Prizes were established in 1970. In 1993, the AMS formalized three categories for the prizes. The prize for "lifetime achievement" is awarded for a book or substantial survey or expository research paper.

Women mathematicians who have won the prize are:


Chauvenet Prize

The Chauvenet Prize is awarded annually by the Mathematical Association of America to the author of an outstanding expository article on a mathematical topic by a member of the association. First awarded in 1925, the Prize is named for William Chauvenet, a professor of mathematics at the United States Naval Academy. It was established through a gift in 1925 from J.L. Coolidge, then MAA President. Winners of the Chauvent Prize are among the most distinguished of mathematical expositors.

Women mathematicians who have won the prize are:

  • 1996 Joan Birman, "New Points of View in Knot Theory," AMS Bulletin, 28(1993).
  • 2001 Carolyn S. Gordon (with David L. Webb), "You can't hear the shape of a drum", American Scientist 84 (1996), 46-55.
  • 2002 Ellen Gethner (with Stan Wagon and Brian Wick), "A Stroll through the Gaussian Primes", American Mathematical Monthly, vol 105, no. 4 (1998), 327-337.

Euler Book Prize

The Euler Book Prize is awarded annually to an author or authors of an outstanding book about mathematics. The Prize is intended to recognize authors of exceptionally well written books with a positive impact on the public's view of mathematics and to encourage the writing of such books. Eligible books include mathematical monographs at the undergraduate level, histories, biographies, works of fiction, poetry; collections of essays, and works on mathematics as it is related to other areas of arts and sciences. To be considered for the Euler Prize a book must be published during the five years preceding the award and must be in English. The prize was established in 2005 and has been given every year at a national meeting of the Association, beginning in 2007, the 300th anniversary of the birth of Leonhard Euler. This award also honors Virginia and Paul Halmos whose generosity made the award possible.

Women mathematicians who have won the prize are:

  • 2012 Daina Taimina, Crocheting Adventures with Hyperbolic Planes, A.K. Peters, 2009.

Beckenback Book Prize

The Beckenbach Book Prize, established in 1986, is the successor to the MAA Book Prize established in 1982. It is named for the late Edwin Beckenbach, a long-time leader in the publications program of the Association and a well-known professor of mathematics at the University of California at Los Angeles. The Prize of $2,500 is intended to recognize the author(s) of a distinguished, innovative book published by the MAA and to encourage the writing of such books. The award is not given on a regularly scheduled basis. To be considered for the Beckenbach Prize a book must have been published during the five years preceding the Award.

Women who have won the prize are:

  • 1996, Constance Reid, The Search for E.T. Bell, Also Known as John Taine, Spectrum, 1993.
  • 2006 Jennifer Quinn (with Arthur Benjamin), Proofs That Really Count: the Art of Combinatorial Proof, Dolciani Mathematical Expositions, 2003.
  • 2014 Judith Grabiner, A Historian Looks Back: The Calculus as Algebra and Selected Writings, MAA Spectrum, 2010.

For more information about the Beckenback prize, see http://www.maa.org/programs/maa-awards/writing-awards/beckenbach-book-prize.


MacArthur Fellowships

MacArthur fellowships, popularly known as the "genius awards," cannot be applied for; rather, candidates are drawn from a pool of initial nominations by an anonymous group of 100 people. The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation aims to recognize people whose achievements in the arts, humanities, sciences, social sciences, and public affairs show the promise of even greater accomplishments in the future. There are no strings attached. Recipients can spend the money, usually anywhere from $150,000 to $375,000 over a period of five years, anyway they want. The fellowships were established in 1981.

Women mathematicians who have received MacArthur Fellowships are:


Alice T. Schafer Prize

The Schafer Prize is awarded to an undergraduate woman in recognition of excellence in mathematics and is sponsored by the Association for Women in Mathematics The Schafer Prize was established in 1990 by the executive committee of the AWM and is named for former AWM president and one of its founding members, Alice T. Schafer, who has contributed a great deal to women in mathematics throughout her career. The criteria for selection includes, but is not limited to, the quality of the nominees' performance in mathematics courses and special programs, exhibition of real interest in mathematics, ability to do independent work, and if applicable, performance in mathematical competitions.

The winners of the Schafer Prize have been:

For more information about the Alice T. Schafer Prize for Excellence in Mathematics by an Undergraduate Woman, see Alice T. Schafer Prize at the Association for Women in Mathematics web site.


M. Gweneth Humphreys Award for Mentorship of Undergraduate Women in Mathematics

This award presented by the Association for Women in Mathematics is named for M. Gweneth Humphreys (1911-2006). Professor Humphreys taught mathematics to women for her entire career at Mount St. Scholastica College, Sophie Newcomb College, and finally at Randolph Macon Woman's College for over thirty years. The award recognizes her commitment to and her profound influence on undergraduate students of mathematics.

Recipients have been:

For more information about this award, see Humphreys Award at the Association for Women in Mathematics web site.


AWM-Microsoft Research Prize in Algebra and Number Theory

The AWM-Microsoft Research Prize serves to highlight exceptional research in some area of algebra by a woman early in her career. The field will be broadly interpreted to include number theory, cryptography, combinatorics and other applications, as well as more traditional areas of algebra. The prize will be awarded every other year, beginning in 2014.

Recipients have been:


AWM-Sadosky Research Prize in Analysis

The AWM-Sadosky Research Prize serves to highlight exceptional research in analysis by a woman early in her career. The field will be broadly interpreted to include all areas of analysis. The award is named for Cora Sadosky, a former president of AWM. The prize will be awarded every other year, beginning in 2014.

Recipients have been:


AWM-Joan & Joseph Birman Research Prize in Topology and Geometry

The purpose of the award is to highlight exceptional research in topology and geometry by a woman early in her career. The field will be broadly interpreted to include topology, geometry, geometric group theory and related areas. The award is made possible by a generous contribution from Joan Birman whose work has been in low dimensional topology and her husband, Joseph, who is a theoretical physicist whose specialty is applications of group theory to solid state physics. The prize will be awarded every other year, beginning in 2015.

Recipients have been:


MAA Yueh-Gin Gung and Dr. Charles Y. Hu Award for Distinguished Service to Mathematics

The Yueh-Gin Gung and Dr. Charles Y. Hu Award for Distinguished Service to Mathematics is the most prestigious award made by the Mathematical Association of America. This award, first given in 1990, is the successor to the Award for Distinguished Service to Mathematics, awarded since 1962.

Women mathematicians who have won this award or the previous Distinguished Service Award are:


Sylvester Medal of the Royal Society of London

The Sylvester Medal has been awarded by the Royal Society of London every three years since 1901 for the encouragement of mathematical research without regard to nationality. It is given in honor of Professor J. J. Sylvester.

Women mathematicians who have won the Sylvester Medal are:

Complete list of winners of the Sylvester Medal


De Morgan Medal of the London Mathematical Society

The De Morgan Medal, the London Mathematical Society's premier award, is awarded every third year in memory of Professor A. De Morgan, the Society's first President. The only criteria for the award is the candidate's contributions to mathematics. The medal was first awarded in 1884.

Women mathematicians who have won the De Morgan Medal are:

Complete list of winners of the De Morgan Medal


Adams Prize

The Adams Prize, given annually by the University of Cambridge to a British mathematician under the age of 40, commemorates the discovery by John Couch Adams of the planet Neptune through calculation of the discrepancies in the orbit of Uranus. It was endowed by members of St John's College, Cambridge, and approved by the Senate of the University in 1848. Each year applications are invited from mathematicians who have worked in a specific area of mathematics.

Women mathematicians who have won the Adams Prize are:

  • 2002 Susan Howson, University of Nottingham (Number Theory)

CRM-Fields-PIMS Prize

The CRM-Fields-PIMS prize is intended to be the premier mathematics prize in Canada. The prize recognizes exceptional achievement in the mathematical sciences. The winner's research should have been conducted primarily in Canada or in affiliation with a Canadian university. The main selection criterion is outstanding contribution to the advancement of research. The prize was established by the Centre de recherches mathematiques and the Fields Institute as the CRM-Fields prize in 1994. In 2005, Pacific Institute for the Mathematical Sciences (PIMS) became an equal partner.

Women mathematicians who have won the CRM-Fields-PIMS prize are:


Florence Nightingale David Award

The Florence Nightingale David Award from the Committee of Presidents of Statistical Societies recognizes a female statistician who exemplifies the contributions of Florence Nightingale David. The award is to be granted to a female statistician who serves as a role model to other women by her contributions to the profession through excellence in research, leadership of multidisciplinary collaborative groups, statistics education, or service to the professional societies. Winners of the award have been:

  • 2001 Nan M. Laird, Harvard School of Public Health
  • 2003 Juliet Popper Schaffer, University of California, Berkeley
  • 2005 Alice S. Whittemore, Stanford University
  • 2007 Nancy Flournoy, University of Missouri-Columbia
  • 2009 Nancy Reid, University of Toronto
  • 2011 Marie Davidian, North Carolina State University
  • 2013 Lynne Billard, University of Georgia
  • 2015 Francesca Dominici, Harvard University

Elizabeth L. Scott Award

This award from the Committee of Presidents of Statistical Societies shall recognize an individual who exemplifies the contributions of Elizabeth L. Scott's lifelong efforts to further the careers of women in academia. The award is given every other year in even numbered years. Winners of the award have been:


Janet L. Norwood Award

The Janet L. Norwood award is presented annually by the School of Public Health at The University of Alabama at Birmingham to recognize outstanding achievement by a woman in the statistical sciences. Dr. Janet Norwood was the first woman commissioner of the US Bureau of Labor Statistics and served as president of the American Statistical Association. The winners of the award have been:

  • 2002 Jane F. Gentleman, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  • 2003 Nan M. Laird, Harvard School of Public Health
  • 2004 Alice S. Whittemore, Stanford University
  • 2005 Clarice R. Weinberg, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
  • 2006 Janet Turk Wittes, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute
  • 2007 Marie Davidian, North Carolina State University
  • 2008 Xihong Lin, Harvard School of Public Health
  • 2009 Nancy L. Geller, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute
  • 2010 L. Adrienne Cupples, Boston University's School of Public Health
  • 2011 Lynne Billard, University of Georgia
  • 2012 Nancy Flournoy, University of Missouri
  • 2013 Kathryn Roeder, Carnegie Mellon University
  • 2014 Judith Singer, Harvard University
  • 2015 Judith Goldberg, New York University
  • 2016 Francesca Dominici, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

UAB web site about the Janet L. Norwood Award.


Salem Prize

The Salem Prize, founded in 1968 by the widow of Raphael Salem, is awarded every year to a young mathematician judged to have done outstanding work in Salem's field of interest, primarily Fourier series and related areas in analysis. The prize is considered highly prestigious. Women who have won the Salem Prize are:

  • 2006 Stephanie Petermichl, University of Texas at Austin
  • 2010 Nalini Anantharaman, Université Paris-Sud, Orsay

Blackwell-Tapia Prize

Founded in 2002, this prize is awarded every second year in honor of the legacy of David H. Blackwell and Richard A. Tapia, two distinguished mathematical scientists who have been inspirations to more than a generation of African American, Latino/Latina, and Native American students and professionals in the mathematical sciences. It recognizes a mathematical scientist who has contributed and continues to contribute significantly to research in his or her field of expertise, and who has served as a role model for mathematical scientists and students from underrepresented minority groups or contributed in other significant ways to addressing the problem of the under-representation of minorities in mathematics. Women who have won the Blackwell-Tapia Prize are:


AWM Emmy Noether Lecturers

The Association for Women in Mathematics established the Emmy Noether Lectures to honor women who have made fundamental and sustained contributions to the mathematical sciences. These one-hour expository lectures are presented at the Joint Mathematics Meetings each January. The Emmy Noether Lecturers have been:

  • 1980 F. Jessie MacWilliams, "Survey of Coding Theory"
  • 1981 Olga Taussky-Todd, "Many Aspects of Pythagorean Triangles"
  • 1982 Julia Robinson, "Functional Equations in Arithmetic"
  • 1983 Cathleen S. Morawetz, "How Do Perturbations of the Wave Equation Work"
  • 1984 Mary Ellen Rudin, "Paracompactness"
  • 1985 Jane Cronin Scanlon, "A Model of Cardiac Fiber: Problems in Singularly Perturbed Systems"
  • 1986 Yvonne Choquet-Bruhat, "On Partial Differentials Equation of Gauge Theories and General Relativity"
  • 1987 Joan S. Birman, "Studying Links via Braids"
  • 1988 Karen K. Uhlenbeck, "Moment Maps in Stable Bundles: Where Analysis Algebra and Topology Meet"
  • 1989 Mary F. Wheeler, "Large Scale Modelling of Problems Arising in Flow in Pourous Media"
  • 1990 Bhama Srinivasan, "The Invasion of Geometry into Finite Group Theory"
  • 1991 Alexandra Bellow, "Almost Everywhere Convergence: The Case for the Ergodic Viewpoint"
  • 1992 Nancy Kopell, "Oscillators and Networks of Them: Which Differences Make a Difference"
  • 1993 Linda Keen, "Hyperbolic Geometry and Spaces of Riemann Surfaces"
  • 1994 Lesley Sibner, "Analysis in Gauge Theory"
  • 1995 Judith D. Sally, "Measuring Noetherian Rings"
  • 1996 Olga Oleinik, "On Some Homogenization Problems For Differential Operators"
  • 1997 Linda Rothschild, "How do Real Manifolds live in a Complex Space"
  • 1998 Dusa McDuff, "Symplectic Structures-A New Approach to Geometry"
  • 1999 Krystyna M. Kuperberg, "Aperiodic Dynamical Systems"
  • 2000 Margaret Wright, "The Mathematics of Optimization"
  • 2001 Sun-Yung Alice Chang, "Nonlinear Equations in Conformal Geometry"
  • 2002 Lenore Blum, "Computing over the Reals: Where Turing meets Newton"
  • 2003 Jean E. Taylor, "Five Little Crystals and How They Grew"
  • 2004 Svetlana R. Katok, "Symbolic dynamics for geodesic flows"
  • 2005 Lai-Sang Young, "From limit cycles to strange attractors"
  • 2006 Ingrid Daubechies, "Mathematical results and challenges in learning theory"
  • 2007 Karen Vogtmann, "Automorphisms of free groups, outer space, and beyond"
  • 2008 Audrey Terras, "Fun with Zeta Functions of Graphs"
  • 2009 Fan Chung, "The Geometry of Graphs"
  • 2010 Carolyn Gordon, "You can't hear the shape of a manifold"
  • 2011 Susan Montgomery, "Orthogonal Representations: From Groups to Hopf Algebras"
  • 2012 Barbara Keyfitz, "Conservation Laws - Not Exactly a la Noether"
  • 2013 Raman Parimala, "A Hasse principle for quadratic forms over function fields"
  • 2104 Georgia Benkart, "Walking on Graphs the Representation Theory Way"
  • 2015 Wen-Ching Winnie Li, "Modular Forms for Congruence and Noncongruence Subgroups"
  • 2016 Karen Smith, "The Power of Noether’s Ring Theory in Understanding Singularities of Complex Algebraic Varieties" (AWM Press Release)
  • 2017 Lisa Jeffrey, "Real Loci in Symplectic Manifolds"
  • 2018 Jill Pipher

AWM web site about the Emmy Noether Lectures.


Emmy Noether Lecturers, International Congress of Mathematicians

The Emmy Noether Lectures at the International Congress of Mathematicians, held every four years, is jointly organized by European Women in Mathematics, the Committee on Women of the Canadian Mathematical Society, and the Association for Women in Mathematics.


AWM/MAA Falconer Lecturers

The Association for Women in Mathematics and the Mathematical Association of America annually present the Etta Z. Falconer Lectures to honor women who have made distinguished contributions to the mathematical sciences or mathematics education. These one-hour expository lectures are presented at Mathfest each summer. While the lectures began with Mathfest 1996, the title "Etta Z. Falconer Lecture" was established in 2004 in memory of Falconer's profound vision and accomplishments in enhancing the movement of minorities and women into scientific careers. The Falconer Lecturers have been:

  • 1996 Karen E. Smith, MIT, "Calculus mod p"
  • 1997 Suzanne M. Lenhart, University of Tennessee, "Applications of Optimal Control to Various Population Models"
  • 1998 Margaret H. Wright, Bell Labs, "The Interior-Point Revolution in Constrained Optimization"
  • 1999 Chuu-Lian Terng, Northeastern University, "Geometry and Visualization of Surfaces"
  • 2000 Audrey Terras, University of California at San Diego, "Finite Quantum Chaos"
  • 2001 Pat Shure, University of Michigan, "The Scholarship of Learning and Teaching: A Look Back and a Look Ahead"
  • 2002 Annie Selden, Tennessee Technological University, "Two Research Traditions Separated by a Common Subject: Mathematics and Mathematics Education"
  • 2003 Katherine P. Layton, Beverly Hills High School, "What I Learned in Forty Years in Beverly Hills 90212"
  • 2004 Bozenna Pasik-Duncan, University of Kansas "Mathematics Education of Tomorrow"
  • 2005 Fern Hunt, National Institute of Standards and Technology, "Techniques for Visualizing Frequency Patterns in DNA"
  • 2006 Trachette Jackson, University of Michigan, "Cancer Modeling: From the Classical to the Contemporary"
  • 2007 Katherine St. John, City University of New York, "Comparing Evolutionary Trees"
  • 2008 Rebecca Goldin, George Mason University, "The Use and Abuse of Statistics in the Media"
  • 2009 Kate Okikiolu, University of California, San Diego, "The sum of squares of wavelengths of a closed surface"
  • 2010 Ami Radunskaya, Pomona College, "Mathematical Challenges in the Treatment of Cancer"
  • 2011 Dawn Lott, Delaware State University, "Mathematical Interventions for Aneurysm Treatment"
  • 2012 Karen King, New York University, "Because I Love Mathematics: The Role of Disciplinary Grounding in Mathematics Education"
  • 2013 Patricia Kenschaft, Montclair University, "Improving Equity and Education: Why and How"
  • 2014 Marie Vitulli, University of Oregon, "From Algebraic to Weak Subintegral Extensions in Algebra and Geometry"
  • 2015 Erica Walker, Teachers College, Columbia University, " 'A Multiplicity All At Once': Mathematics for Everyone, Everywhere."
  • 2016 Izabella Laba, University of British Columbia, "Harmonic Analysis and Additive Combinatorics of Fractals"
  • 2017 Talithia Williams, Harvey Mudd College,"Not So Hidden Figures: Unveiling Mathematical Talent."

AWM web site about the Falconer Lectures.


AWM-SIAM Sonia Kovalevsky Lecturers

The Association for Women in Mathematics in cooperation with the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) sponsors the AWM-SIAM Sonia Kovalevksy Lecture Series. The lecture is given annually at the SIAM Annual Meeting by a woman who has made distinguished contributions in applied or computational mathematics. The lectureship may be awarded to any woman in the scientific or engineering community. The Kovalevsky Lecturers have been:

  • 2003 Linda R. Petzold, University of California, Santa Barbara, "Towards the Multiscale Simulation of Biochemical Networks"
  • 2004 Joyce R. McLaughlin, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, "Interior Elastodynamics Inverse Problems: Creating Shear Wave Speed Images of Tissue"
  • 2005 Ingrid Daubechies, Princeton University, "Superfast and (Super)sparse Algorithms"
  • 2006 Irene Fonseca, Carnegie-Mellon University, "New Challenges in the Calculus of Variations"
  • 2007 Lai-Sang Young, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, "Shear-Induced Chaos"
  • 2008 Dianne O'Leary, University of Maryland, "A Noisy Adiabatic Theorem: Wilkinson Meets Schrodinger's Cat" [Video]
  • 2009 Andrea Bertozzi, University of California, Los Angeles, "Swarming by Nature and by Design" [Video]
  • 2010 Suzanne Lenhart, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, "Mixing it up: Discrete and Continuous Optimal Control for Biological Models" [Video]
  • 2011 Susanne Brenner, Louisiana State University, "A Cautionary Tale in Numerical PDEs"
  • 2012 Barbara Keyfitz, Ohio State University, "The Role of Characteristics in Conservation Laws" [Video]
  • 2013 Margaret Cheney, Colorado State University, "Introduction to Radar Imaging"
  • 2014 Irene Gamba, University of Texas at Austin, "The evolution of complex interactions in non-linear kinetic systems"
  • 2015 Linda J. S. Allen, Texas Tech University, "Predicting Population Extinction"
  • 2016 Lisa Cauci, Tulane University, "The Biofluids of Reproduction"
  • 2017 Liliana Borcea, University of Michigan

See the AWM web site or the SIAM webs site for more information about the Sonia Kovalevsky Lecture.


Krieger-Nelson Prize Lectureship for Distinguished Research by Women in Mathematics

The Canadian Mathematical Society inaugurated the The Krieger-Nelson Prize to recognize outstanding research by a female mathematician. The first prize was awarded in 1995. The winners have been:

  • 1995 Nancy Reid, University of Toronto
  • 1996 Olga Kharlampovich, McGill University
  • 1997 Cathleen Morawetz, New York University
  • 1998 Catherine Sulem, University of Toronto
  • 1999 Nicole Tomczak-Jaegermann, University of Alberta
  • 2000 C. Kanta Gupta, University of Manitoba
  • 2001 Lisa Jeffrey, University of Toronto
  • 2002 Priscilla Greenwood, University of British Columbia and Arizona State University
  • 2003 Leah Keshet, University of British Columbia
  • 2004 Not awarded
  • 2005 Barbara Keyfitz, University of Houston
  • 2006 Penny Haxell, University of Waterloo
  • 2007 Pauline van den Driessche, University of Victoria
  • 2008 Izabella Laba, University of British Columbia
  • 2009 Yael Karshon, University of Toronto
  • 2010 Lia Bronsard, McMaster University
  • 2011 Rachel Kuske, University of British Columbia
  • 2012 Ailana Fraser, University of British Columbia
  • 2013 Chantal David, Concordia University
  • 2014 Gail Wolkowicz, McMaster University
  • 2015 Jane Ye, University of Victoria
  • 2016 Malabika Pramanik, University of British Columbia

As part of its celebrations of the World Mathematical Year in 2000, the Canadian Mathematical Society sponsored the creation of a poster on women in mathematics. The poster features the six outstanding women mathematicians who were awarded the Krieger-Nelson prize from 1995 to 2000.


Mary Cartwright Lecturers

The Mary Cartwright Lecture is an annual event organized by the London Mathematical Society and forms part of the annual program of Society Meetings. Lectures are given by at least one female mathematician each year. Female lecturers have been:

  • 2000 Caroline Series, "Exploring the space of quasifuchsian groups"
  • 2001 Cathleen Synge Morawetz, "Mathematics and flying aeroplanes"
  • 2002 Frances Kirwan FRS, "Moduli spaces of Riemann surfaces and holomorphic bundles"
  • 2003 Jennifer Chayes, "Mathematical models of the internet and World Wide Web"
  • 2004 Mary Rees FRS, "The topographer's view of parameter spaces"
  • 2005 Elizabeth Thompson, "Relatedness, genome sharing, and the detection of genes"
  • 2006 Ulrike Tillmann, "The topology of strings: Mumford’s conjecture and beyond"
  • 2007 Angela Stevens, "Interacting Cell Systems: An Example for Mathematical Modeling in the Life-Sciences"
  • 2008 Valerie Beral FRS, "Mathematics of medicine: breast cancer treatment and prevention"
  • 2009 Dusa McDuff, FRS, "Symplectic embeddings of 4-dimensional ellipsoids"
  • 2010 Ruth Gregory, "Fun with extra dimensions" and Ana Achucarro, "Maths in the sky: the secret life of cosmic strings"
  • 2011 Alison Etheridge, "Evolution in a spatial continuum"
  • 2012 Agata Smoktunowicz, "Old and new questions in noncommutative algebra"
  • 2013 Margaret Wright, "A Mathematical Journey in Non-Derivative Optimization"
  • 2014 Reidun Twarock, "Viruses and geometry: hidden symmetries in virology" and Anne Taormina, "Moonshines"
  • 2015 Maria Esteban, "Eigenvalue problems in relativistic Quantum Mechanics, theory and applications"
  • 2016 Gwyneth Stallard, "Pits, gaps and spiders' webs"

More information about the Mary Cartwright Lecture can be found at the London Mathematical Society website.


American Mathematical Society Colloquium Lecturers

The American Mathematical Society Colloquium Lectures have been presented since 1896. Women mathematicians who have presented lectures are:

Complete list of the AMS Colloquium Lecturers.


Josiah Willard Gibbs Lecturers

To commemorate the name of Professor Gibbs, the American Mathematical Society established an honorary lectureship in 1923 to be known as the Josiah Willard Gibbs Lectureship. The lectures are of a semi-popular nature and are given by invitation. They are usually devoted to mathematics or its applications. It is hoped that these lectures will enable the public and the academic community to become aware of the contribution that mathematics is making to present-day thinking and to modern civilization.

Women mathematicians who have presented the Josiah Willard Gibbs Lectures have been:


Earle Raymond Hedrick Lecturers

The Earle Raymond Hedrick Lectures were established by the Mathematical Association of America in 1952 to present to the Association a lecturer of known skill as an expositor of mathematics "who will present a series of at most three lectures accessible to a large fraction of those who teach college mathematics."

Women mathematicians who have presented the Earle Raymond Hedrick Lectures have been:


J. Sutherland Frame Lectures

The J. Sutherland Frame Lectures were established by Pi Mu Epsilon to honor James Sutherland Frame who was instrumental in founding the Pi Mul Epsilon Journal and in creating the Pi Mu Epsilon Summer Student Paper Conferences in conjunction with the American Mathematical Society and the Mathematical Association of America. The lectures are presented at the summer meeting of the Mathematical Association of America.

Women mathematicians who have presented the J. Sutherland Frame Lectures have been:

  • 1988 Doris Schattschneider, "You Too Can Tile the Conway Way"
  • 1989 Jane Cronin Scanlon, "Entrainment of Frequency
  • 1995 Marjorie Senechal, "Tilings as Differential Games"
  • 2004 Joan P. Hutchinson, "When Five Colors Suffice"

Complete List of J. Sutherland Frame Lecturers.


Presidents of the Association for Women in Mathematics

The Association for Women in Mathematics was established in 1971 to encourage women to enter careers in mathematics and related areas, and to promote equal opportunity and equal treatment of women in the mathematical community. The Presidents of the AWM have been:


Presidents of the Mathematical Association of America

In December 1915, ten women and 96 men met at The Ohio State University to established the organization that became the Mathematical Association of America. Women who have served as President of the MAA have been


Presidents of the American Mathematical Society

The American Mathematical Society was founded in 1889. Since then, women who have served as President of the AMS have been


Presidents of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics

The Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) was incorporated in 1952 as a nonprofit organization to convey useful mathematical knowledge to other professionals who could implement mathematical theory for practical, industrial, or scientific use. Women who have served as President of SIAM have been


Presidents of The Society for Mathematical Biology

The Society for Mathematical Biology, founded in 1973, is an international society that exists to promote and foster interactions between the mathematical and biological sciences communities. Women who have served as President of the Society have been


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